Character Trees RocketJump Film School

Character Trees (2015) RocketJump Film School

The following description prompts, starting from the feet up, could be a useful way for us to build a picture of our characters. The exercise is meant to help you figure out the psychology of your character which will impact what decisions the character makes within the story. The example below is from Video Game Highschool.

The following is FILM CRIT HULK’s outline of each part of the tree:

Source: http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2014/03/06/hulk-presents-character-trees

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Rocketjump Film School How to Write a Logline

 

  1. Who is your main character?
  2. What do they want?
  3. What’s in their way?
  4. How do they overcome it?
  5. Where does it take place?

Write down the surface details, e.g. profession, and personality details of your main character. Combine the key character descriptors, those that will drive the narrative, with the setting and conflict to make a 1 – 2 sentence logline.

Animation Development David B. Levy Notes Part 01

animation-development-from-pitch-to-production_1

Animation Development David B. Levy

This book is a great introduction to the process of creating a pitch bible and the process of pitching to and working with development executives and networks. Two main emphases have been made so far in order for a pitch to be successful:

  • Demonstrate your industry experience as proof of your ability to put a team together to drive your ideas onto the screen.
  • Demonstrate the strength of your ideas with unique characters that drive stories specific to how they react to the world and conflict you put them in (the pitch bible).

I’m aware that my industry experience is relatively small at the moment, with only placement year behind me, but I’ve often read that ‘projects are the new portfolios’. Hopefully by working hard in final year, we can create an outcome which will be proof of our abilities with teamwork, storytelling and production.

 

Audiobook Notes Chapters 01 – 03:

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Schoolism Week 07 Designing with Light

In week 07 of Designing with Color and Light, my biggest take-away was the power of contrast when telling a story within a frame. Contrast in the wrong places will draw the eye away from the flow of the story. This could be contrast in value structure which is designed with local values, the effects of atmospheric perspective and placement of light and shadow. Also consider edge softness and depth of field. Fowkes also talks about creating more interesting greys.

My notes:

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Schoolism Week 06 Light and Atmosphere

Week 06 in Designing With Color and Light on Schoolism talked about the use of light and atmosphere when designing frames within a sequence. My biggest take away from this week so far is the power of being able to quickly thumbnail the colors of a scene to see what works best. The homework for this week is not just about choosing a warm and cool palette. This week is about trying to push further to use light and atmosphere to bring out the emotional beat of the story e.g. discovering or travelling through a mysterious city or town.

My notes:

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Heather Kenyon: Pitch Bible

Creating an idea for a series which we love and which still adheres to the requirements of a particular broadcaster has been a recent shared challenge for me at Flickerpix. There is still a lot about writing character driven narrative which I’m trying to figure out. I see the broadcaster brief as less of a limitation and more of a challenge. How does writing for a 10 year old audience differ from an 8 or 14 year old audience? I would guess that looking at particular life events would be a good place to start but what about the language and types of characters? I usually categorise the books that I read a little more broadly into children, young adult fiction and other, usually depending on the age of the main characters if it’s a more modern book. Paying more attention to target audience in the bookshelves might be more helpful.

Trying to distill an idea into a short form while still maintaining the humour and demonstrating how the characters drive the narrative has been another challenge. The video link below has some useful tips.

How to Create a Pitch Bible with Heather Kenyon

  • Think about the competition. Is there something on air that is already similar to your idea? Have a good answer why it’s not that.
  • Think about where you see your show. Know the difference between networks and where you are able to sell. Don’t handicap yourself with a tiny niche.
  • Think about what relates to your target audience. What are in their lives?
  • Ask for feedback. What doesn’t make sense to them? Start soft pitching the idea. See where you stumble or are too convoluted.
  • Your bible is your presentation guide. Don’t read from it. Ask if people want a hardcopy or a pdf emailed to them.
  • Kidscreen, miptv, mipcom (bigger for animation).
  • Your bible should be around 10 pages, a fun easy read. Overview, character descriptions, episode examples.
  • Overview – tagline, start at the beginning, you need to start with the basic information! What are the rules, tone, genre, length of episodes, storylines? The overview is 1 – 2 pages describing the complete package. Give exact examples, be clear about the points. This is the stage.
  • Character descriptions. Adjectives don’t tell you much. Be creative about how you describe character. The look of the character can be a good opportunity to start with ‘the opposite’ statement. E.g. Mandy is disgusting. She uses her sweet looks to get her way. Show the conflict between what the character is and what the character wants to be.
  • Episode spring boards. This is the area that makes or breaks the bible. Show the beginning, middle and end. Give the examples that draw the overviews and characters together. What is it about the characters that motivate actions in the story line? Who is important in your show? Have you given them enough prickles in their personalities to drive the story off of each other?