Edgar Wright – How to Do Visual Comedy

As well as having compositional problems, Alec also suggested that we needed to make the timing snappier and that we should have a look at Edgar Wright for some inspiration for creating comedy. I found this video from the ‘Every Frame a Painting’ (Tony Zhou’s) YouTube channel: Edgar Wright – How to Do Visual Comedy and it contains lots of points that we could consider.

  • Find humour in places that other people don’t look e.g. a character moving from point a to point b.
  • How can you creatively foreshadow an important/disastrous event that will happen later?
  • How can you creatively show how one character feels about another/reacts to another?
  • How can you take simple mundane scenes and find new ways to do them? Consider how a laugh can come from the staging alone. Things popping into and out of frame unexpectedly can create a laugh. A laugh can be created from zooming, a crane up and panning – all camera moves that can reveal something unexpected about the character’s situation or create comedic drama.
  • “Cinema is a matter of what’s in the frame and what’s not in the frame.” – Martin Scorsese

These are 8 things that filmmakers should try out to create visual comedy:

  1. Things entering the frame in funny ways.
  2. People leaving the frame in funny ways.
  3. There and back again – a character moving to direct your eyes to a situation and then returning to the original state.
  4. Matching scene transitions.
  5. The perfectly timed sound effect.
  6. Action sychronised to the music
  7. Super dramatic lighting cues.
  8. Fence gags
  9. bonus: Imaginary gun fights
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One thought on “Edgar Wright – How to Do Visual Comedy

  1. Pingback: Research: TV Series, Features and Shorts. | Natasha Crowley

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